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Diane Cilento

Diane Cilento

Birthday: October 5, 1933 (78 years) Died: October 6, 2011 (12 years Ago in Cairns)

HomeTown: Brisbane, Queensland, Australia

Diane Cilento was an actress who was originally from Queensland in Australia. She was of Italian ancestry to some degree. A candidate for the Academy Award in the category of Best Supporting Actress, she was previously considered for the award. Cilento was considered for the Tony Award in the category of Best Featured Actress in a Play for her performance in a play in which she portrayed Helen of Troy. Cilento was born into a family that was considered to have moderate wealth in the year 1932. He was born in Brisbane, which is the state capital of Queensland. Her grandfather’s father was Charles Thomas McGlew, an influential businessman who established the Liberty Motor Oil Company and lived from 1870 to 1931. Raphael “Ray” Cilento, a practising physician, was Cliento’s father (1893-1985). He rose to prominence while serving as the director of the Australian Institute of Tropical Medicine, the director of the Commonwealth Government’s Division of Tropical Hygiene, the director-general of Health and Medical Services, the president of the Queensland Medical Board, a high-ranking member of the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration, the director for Refugees and Displaced Persons, and the director of disaster relief in Palestine. He also served as the director of the Australian Institute of Tropical Medicine and the director of the Commonwealth Government’s Division of Tropical Raphael devoted a significant portion of his professional life to the fight against malaria and other tropical illnesses. Phyllis Cilento, also known as Phyllis Cilento (née McGlew, 1894 – 1987), was a medical professional as well as a medical writer. She was Cilento’s mother. Phylis rose to notoriety as a result of her campaigning for the decriminalisation of abortion in Australia, as well as for family planning and contraception. She is the author of various books that are focused on medical topics. Her clinical investigations focused on the use of vitamin E both as a treatment and as a means of avoiding the formation of blood clots. Cilento was the sixth child of her renowned parents’ total of six children to be born. Her four brothers and sisters have all chosen careers in the medical field, following in their parents’ footsteps. The most well-known of Cilento’s siblings was Margaret Cilento, a painter and printmaker who worked professionally (1923-2006). Both the National Gallery of Victoria and the National Gallery of Australia have collections of Margaret’s artwork in their permanent collections. While Cilento was residing in Australia, he was expelled from the school he attended. After that, she continued her education in another country, this time attending classes in the state of New York in the United States. She made the decision to pursue a career in acting and was successful in obtaining a scholarship to attend the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art (RADA), which is based in London. During the early 1950s, she made England her permanent home. Following her graduation from RADA, Cilento started a career as a theatrical actress. She was eventually offered a five-year contract by the British film producer Alexander Korda (1893-1956), and took the offer. She started out with several small roles in film. Her first leading role was playing British governess Ruth Elton in the romantic drama “Passage Home” (1955). In the film, Elton rejects a marriage proposal from Captain Lucky Ryland (played by Peter Finch), who she barely knows. Ryland then tries to rape her. She eventually marries another man, but she is secretly in love with her would-be rapist. During the late 1950s, Cilento found steady work in British films. She played the only woman in a love triangle in the circus-themed “The Woman for Joe” (1955). She played the between maid in the castaway-themed “The Admirable Crichton” (1957), an adaptation of a play by J. M. Barrie (1860-1937). She played a free-thinker in the romantic comedy “The Truth About Women” (1957),concerning the memories of an old man. She also had a role in the aviation disaster film “Jet Storm” (1959), in which a man has placed a bomb on a passenger airplane. In the early 1960s, Cilento continued to have notable roles. She played the female lead Denise Colby in the psychological thriller “The Full Treatment” (1960). In the film Denise’s husband struggles with mood swings and the dark impulse to kill his wife, which makes him fear for his sanity. The film was one of the murder-themed films produced by Hammer Film Productions. Cilento played the supporting role of a murder suspect’s wife in the thriller film “The Naked Edge” (1961). The film is mainly remembered as the last film role for protagonist Gary Cooper (1901-1961), who died of prostate cancer following the film’s completion. Cilento played the murder victim Liane Dane in the crime film “I Thank a Fool” (1962), where a female doctor is suspected of killing her own patient. Cilento played the most acclaimed role of her career as Molly Seagrim in the comedy film “Tom Jones” (1963), the title character’s first love. She was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress, but the award was instead won by rival actress Margaret Rutherford (1892 – 1972). Cilento next played one of the murder suspects in the crime film “The Third Secret” (1964). In the film a well-known psychoanalyst is found murdered within his own residence, and a number of his patients are suspected of killing him. The main plot twist is that the victim was killed by someone much closer to him than his patients. Cilento also played the prostitute Cyrenne in the comedy-drama film “Rattle of a Simple Man” (1964). The film concerns the efforts of 39-year-old virgin man to finally have sex. She next played the Italian noblewoman Contessina Antonia Romola de’ Medici in the historical film “The Agony and the Ecstasy” (1965), a fictionalized version of the life of the artist Michelangelo (1475-1564). The film was critically acclaimed and nominated for awards, but under-performed at the box office. The struggling studio 20th Century Fox reportedly lost over 5 million dollars due to this box office flop. Cilento had the supporting role of the caretaker Jessie in the revisionist Western film “Hombre” (1967). The film depicted the relations between the Apache and the white men in 19th-century Arizona. The film earned 12 million dollars in the worldwide box office, one of the greatest hits in its year for release. Cilento’s last film role in the 1960s was the photographer Reingard in the film “Negatives” (1968). The film concerned a couple who like to role-play as part of their erotic fantasies. But they choose to play the role of famous murdered Dr. Hawley Harvey Crippen (1862-1910) and his lover. This film is remembered as the directorial debut of Hungarian expatriate Peter Medak (1937-), who later had a lengthy career. Cilento gained her first regular television role when cast as Lady Sarah Bellasize in the prison-themed television series “Rogues’ Gallery” (1968-1969). It depicted life in the famous Newgate Prison (1188 -1902) of London during the 18th century. The series lasted 2 seasons and a total of 10 episodes. Following a hiatus in her film career, Cilento returned in the dystopian science fiction film “Z.P.G.” ( “Zero Population Growth”, 1972). The film depicted a future Earth suffering from overpopulation and environmental destruction. The world’s government has decreed than no new child must be born over the next 30 years, but a couple decide to illegally procreate. Cilento played the supporting role of Edna Borden. Borden offers to help conceal the new baby from the world, while she actually wants to keep it for herself. The film’s was well received in its time, and lead actress Geraldine Chaplin (1944-) won an award for this role. Cilento played the role of the famous German test pilot Hanna Reitsch (1912-1979) in the historical film “Hitler: The Last Ten Days”. (1973) The film depicted the last few days in the life of Adolf Hitler (1889-1945), based on the eye-witness account of Gerhard Boldt (1918 – 1981). The authenticity of the source book has since been questioned. Cilento had a supporting role in the classic horror film “The Wicker Man” (1973), concerning a neo-pagan cult which practices Celtic paganism. The film was based on a novel by David Pinner (1940-). The film won the 1978 Saturn Award for Best Horror Film, and has often been listed among the best British films. It was one of the most acclaimed films of Cilento’s career. The lesser known film “The Tiger Lily” (1975) included Cilento’s last film role in the 1970s. She gained another regular role in the television series “Tycoon” (1978), which only lasted a single season and a total of 13 episodes. Her film career was in decline during the 1980s, and Cilento chose to return to her native Queensland. She settled in the small town of Mossman, named after the Mossman River which flows though it. She built the outdoor theater Karnak in the local rain-forest, which she operated for the rest of her life. She used the theater as a venue for experimental drama. In 2001, Cilento was awarded with Australian’s Centenary Medal for her services to theater. In 2007, Cilento published her autobiography “My Nine Lives”. In her last years she was suffering from cancer. In 2011, she died due to this disease while hospitalized in the Cairns Base Hospital. The hospital was the largest major hospital in Far North Queensland. Cilento was 79-years-old at the time of her death. Cilento was survived by her daughter Giovanna Volpe and her son Jason Connery (1963-), her only heirs. A collection of items from her personal estate was donated by her heirs to the Queensland University of Technology. The collection reportedly included “hundreds of books, memorabilia, posters, furniture”. Also included were original scripts which Cilento had inherited from her last husband, the playwright Anthony Shaffer. Original scripts by both Cilento and Shaffer have been digitized, and made available to scholars through the University’s digital collections. Diane Cilento was born on October 5, 1933 in Brisbane, Australia. Diane Cilento died on October 6, 2011 at the age of 78 years in Cairns. Check below for more deets about Diane Cilento. This page will put a light upon the Diane Cilento bio, wiki, age, birthday, family details, dating, trivia, photos, lesser-known facts, and more.

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Diane Cilento Profile:

Diane Cilento Profile Information
Stage Name Diane Cilento
Real Name Diane Cilento
Profession(s) Actress, Director, Writer,
Birthday October 5, 1933
Zodiac Sign Libra
Death Died on October 6, 2011 (12 years ago) (Age: 78 years) in Cairns
Gender Female
Birthplace Brisbane, Australia
Hometown Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
Nationality Australian

Diane Cilento Family

Father: Not Available
Mother: Not Available
Brother(s): Not Available
Sister(s): Not Available

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Family and Personal Life

Diane Cilento‘ father’s name is Not Available and Diane Cilento‘ mother’s name is Not Available.

Diane Cilento Trivia

  • Diane Cilento was born in Brisbane, Australia.
  • Diane Cilento’s birth sign is Libra.
  • Diane Cilento was an actress who was originally from Queensland in Australia. She was of Italian ancestry to some degree. A candidate for the Academy Award in the category of Best Supporting Actress, she was previously considered for the award. Cilento was considered for the Tony Award in the category of Best Featured Actress in a Play for her performance in a play in which she portrayed Helen of Troy. Cilento was born into a family that was considered to have moderate wealth in the year 1932. He was born in Brisbane, which is the state capital of Queensland. Her grandfather’s father was Charles Thomas McGlew, an influential businessman who established the Liberty Motor Oil Company and lived from 1870 to 1931. Raphael “Ray” Cilento, a practising physician, was Cliento’s father (1893-1985). He rose to prominence while serving as the director of the Australian Institute of Tropical Medicine, the director of the Commonwealth Government’s Division of Tropical Hygiene, the director-general of Health and Medical Services, the president of the Queensland Medical Board, a high-ranking member of the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration, the director for Refugees and Displaced Persons, and the director of disaster relief in Palestine. He also served as the director of the Australian Institute of Tropical Medicine and the director of the Commonwealth Government’s Division of Tropical Raphael devoted a significant portion of his professional life to the fight against malaria and other tropical illnesses. Phyllis Cilento, also known as Phyllis Cilento (née McGlew, 1894 – 1987), was a medical professional as well as a medical writer. She was Cilento’s mother. Phylis rose to notoriety as a result of her campaigning for the decriminalisation of abortion in Australia, as well as for family planning and contraception. She is the author of various books that are focused on medical topics. Her clinical investigations focused on the use of vitamin E both as a treatment and as a means of avoiding the formation of blood clots. Cilento was the sixth child of her renowned parents’ total of six children to be born. Her four brothers and sisters have all chosen careers in the medical field, following in their parents’ footsteps. The most well-known of Cilento’s siblings was Margaret Cilento, a painter and printmaker who worked professionally (1923-2006). Both the National Gallery of Victoria and the National Gallery of Australia have collections of Margaret’s artwork in their permanent collections. While Cilento was residing in Australia, he was expelled from the school he attended. After that, she continued her education in another country, this time attending classes in the state of New York in the United States. She made the decision to pursue a career in acting and was successful in obtaining a scholarship to attend the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art (RADA), which is based in London. During the early 1950s, she made England her permanent home. Following her graduation from RADA, Cilento started a career as a theatrical actress. She was eventually offered a five-year contract by the British film producer Alexander Korda (1893-1956), and took the offer. She started out with several small roles in film. Her first leading role was playing British governess Ruth Elton in the romantic drama “Passage Home” (1955). In the film, Elton rejects a marriage proposal from Captain Lucky Ryland (played by Peter Finch), who she barely knows. Ryland then tries to rape her. She eventually marries another man, but she is secretly in love with her would-be rapist. During the late 1950s, Cilento found steady work in British films. She played the only woman in a love triangle in the circus-themed “The Woman for Joe” (1955). She played the between maid in the castaway-themed “The Admirable Crichton” (1957), an adaptation of a play by J. M. Barrie (1860-1937). She played a free-thinker in the romantic comedy “The Truth About Women” (1957),concerning the memories of an old man. She also had a role in the aviation disaster film “Jet Storm” (1959), in which a man has placed a bomb on a passenger airplane. In the early 1960s, Cilento continued to have notable roles. She played the female lead Denise Colby in the psychological thriller “The Full Treatment” (1960). In the film Denise’s husband struggles with mood swings and the dark impulse to kill his wife, which makes him fear for his sanity. The film was one of the murder-themed films produced by Hammer Film Productions. Cilento played the supporting role of a murder suspect’s wife in the thriller film “The Naked Edge” (1961). The film is mainly remembered as the last film role for protagonist Gary Cooper (1901-1961), who died of prostate cancer following the film’s completion. Cilento played the murder victim Liane Dane in the crime film “I Thank a Fool” (1962), where a female doctor is suspected of killing her own patient. Cilento played the most acclaimed role of her career as Molly Seagrim in the comedy film “Tom Jones” (1963), the title character’s first love. She was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress, but the award was instead won by rival actress Margaret Rutherford (1892 – 1972). Cilento next played one of the murder suspects in the crime film “The Third Secret” (1964). In the film a well-known psychoanalyst is found murdered within his own residence, and a number of his patients are suspected of killing him. The main plot twist is that the victim was killed by someone much closer to him than his patients. Cilento also played the prostitute Cyrenne in the comedy-drama film “Rattle of a Simple Man” (1964). The film concerns the efforts of 39-year-old virgin man to finally have sex. She next played the Italian noblewoman Contessina Antonia Romola de’ Medici in the historical film “The Agony and the Ecstasy” (1965), a fictionalized version of the life of the artist Michelangelo (1475-1564). The film was critically acclaimed and nominated for awards, but under-performed at the box office. The struggling studio 20th Century Fox reportedly lost over 5 million dollars due to this box office flop. Cilento had the supporting role of the caretaker Jessie in the revisionist Western film “Hombre” (1967). The film depicted the relations between the Apache and the white men in 19th-century Arizona. The film earned 12 million dollars in the worldwide box office, one of the greatest hits in its year for release. Cilento’s last film role in the 1960s was the photographer Reingard in the film “Negatives” (1968). The film concerned a couple who like to role-play as part of their erotic fantasies. But they choose to play the role of famous murdered Dr. Hawley Harvey Crippen (1862-1910) and his lover. This film is remembered as the directorial debut of Hungarian expatriate Peter Medak (1937-), who later had a lengthy career. Cilento gained her first regular television role when cast as Lady Sarah Bellasize in the prison-themed television series “Rogues’ Gallery” (1968-1969). It depicted life in the famous Newgate Prison (1188 -1902) of London during the 18th century. The series lasted 2 seasons and a total of 10 episodes. Following a hiatus in her film career, Cilento returned in the dystopian science fiction film “Z.P.G.” ( “Zero Population Growth”, 1972). The film depicted a future Earth suffering from overpopulation and environmental destruction. The world’s government has decreed than no new child must be born over the next 30 years, but a couple decide to illegally procreate. Cilento played the supporting role of Edna Borden. Borden offers to help conceal the new baby from the world, while she actually wants to keep it for herself. The film’s was well received in its time, and lead actress Geraldine Chaplin (1944-) won an award for this role. Cilento played the role of the famous German test pilot Hanna Reitsch (1912-1979) in the historical film “Hitler: The Last Ten Days”. (1973) The film depicted the last few days in the life of Adolf Hitler (1889-1945), based on the eye-witness account of Gerhard Boldt (1918 – 1981). The authenticity of the source book has since been questioned. Cilento had a supporting role in the classic horror film “The Wicker Man” (1973), concerning a neo-pagan cult which practices Celtic paganism. The film was based on a novel by David Pinner (1940-). The film won the 1978 Saturn Award for Best Horror Film, and has often been listed among the best British films. It was one of the most acclaimed films of Cilento’s career. The lesser known film “The Tiger Lily” (1975) included Cilento’s last film role in the 1970s. She gained another regular role in the television series “Tycoon” (1978), which only lasted a single season and a total of 13 episodes. Her film career was in decline during the 1980s, and Cilento chose to return to her native Queensland. She settled in the small town of Mossman, named after the Mossman River which flows though it. She built the outdoor theater Karnak in the local rain-forest, which she operated for the rest of her life. She used the theater as a venue for experimental drama. In 2001, Cilento was awarded with Australian’s Centenary Medal for her services to theater. In 2007, Cilento published her autobiography “My Nine Lives”. In her last years she was suffering from cancer. In 2011, she died due to this disease while hospitalized in the Cairns Base Hospital. The hospital was the largest major hospital in Far North Queensland. Cilento was 79-years-old at the time of her death. Cilento was survived by her daughter Giovanna Volpe and her son Jason Connery (1963-), her only heirs. A collection of items from her personal estate was donated by her heirs to the Queensland University of Technology. The collection reportedly included “hundreds of books, memorabilia, posters, furniture”. Also included were original scripts which Cilento had inherited from her last husband, the playwright Anthony Shaffer. Original scripts by both Cilento and Shaffer have been digitized, and made available to scholars through the University’s digital collections.

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Frequently Asked Questions

Q: Where is Diane Cilento from?
A: Diane Cilento was born in Brisbane, Australia and Diane Cilento' hometown: Brisbane, Australia
Q: How old is Diane Cilento today?
A: Died on October 6, 2011 (12 years ago) (Age: 78 years) in Cairns
Q: When was Diane Cilento born?
A: Diane Cilento was born on October 5
Q: What is the profession of Diane Cilento?
Q: What is the nationality of Diane Cilento?
A: Diane Cilento holds Australian citizenship.
Q: When is Diane Cilento's birthday?
A: Diane Cilento's birthday is on October 5, 1933.
Q: What is the zodiac sign of Diane Cilento?
A: Diane Cilento's zodiac sign is Libra.
Q: What are most searched terms about Diane Cilento on the Internet?
A: Most searched terms about Diane Cilento on the Internet are Diane Cilento marriage, Diane Cilento age, Diane Cilento wiki, Diane Cilento photos, Diane Cilento lover, Diane Cilento instagram, Diane Cilento facebook, Diane Cilento family, Diane Cilento salary, Diane Cilento height, Diane Cilento bio, Diane Cilento income, Diane Cilento house, Diane Cilento latest news, Diane Cilento tiktok, Diane Cilento musically.